Cruel treatment of dogs bound for slaughter in Indonesia is exposed

Dogs are filmed being tied up, stuffed in sacks and piled up in trucks on their way to be slaughtered in Indonesia as governor vows to end the cruel trade

  • Investigators found dogs destined for slaughter being abused in Indonesia  
  • Animals filmed bound up in sacks and piled one on top of the other in trucks
  • Images were captured in the town of Solo, one of Indonesia’s dog meat capitals
  • Governor of the province has now called for dog meat vendors to be shut down 
  • WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT 

Dogs destined for the slaughterhouse have been filmed tied up in sacks with their mouths bound in Indonesia – prompting officials to order an end to the cruel trade.

Investigators captured the distressing videos and images in the town of Solo, one of the capitals of Indonesia’s dog meat trade, where an estimated 14,000 dogs are slaughtered each month.

Ganjar Pranowo, governor of Central Java province, has now called for the city’s 82 dog meat vendors to be shut down after activists confronted him with the evidence. 

Ganjar Pranowo, governor of Indonesia’s Central Java province, has vowed to end the dog meat trade after investigators uncovered horrifying abuse of animals bound for slaughter

Dogs were pictured bound up in sacks with their mouths tied shut and piled high in trucks taking them for slaughter in the ‘dog meat capital’ of Solo

Investigators also found dogs being slaughtered in unhygienic conditions, risking the spread of rabies, and dogs being killed in front of other dogs, unnecessarily increasing their stress and suffering.  

Governor Pranowo spoke out after meeting with campaigners from Dog Meat Free Indonesia earlier this month. 

He said: ‘We must encourage the Solo City government to make strict rules, the DPRD to make regulations that prohibit people from eating or selling dog meat.’

Campaigners have also secured a commitment from Mr Juliyatmono, the regent of Karanganyar where Solo is located, to end the practice.

While little action has yet been taken, they are hoping that the intervention of the local governor will pressurise authorities to act.  

Kelly O’Meara, a member of DMFI and Humane Society International, said: ‘The dog meat trade is one of the easiest ways to spread rabies. 

‘Central Java hasn’t had a case of rabies for nearly 25 years, so if it wants to retain its rabies-free status, there is no question that it needs to shut down dog meat traders.

Investigators believe 14,000 dogs are killed every month to satisfy demand in Solo, but the regional governor has now called for the practice to be shut down

Solo has 82 vendors selling dog meat, with campaigners saying the animals are often transported and killed in unsanitary conditions that risks spreading rabies

Activists also believe that many of the animals killed in Solo’s markets are pets that are stolen by unscrupulous suppliers

‘Our latest DMFI investigation has been a wake up call for Central Java’s lawmakers because it shows how a trade fueled by crime and supported by only a tiny percentage of the people is putting the entire population at risk.’ 

Karin Franken, of the Jakarta Animal Aid Network, added: ‘We are optimistic that the governor of Central Java will take strong and urgent actions to ensure prohibition rules are passed to end the trade in, slaughter and consumption of dogs. 

‘We know that only a minority of Indonesians consume dog meat, yet the trade threatens the health and safety of the entire nation, not to mention results in the immeasurable and unimaginable suffering of tens of thousands of dogs throughout Indonesia each month. 

‘It is a cruel and dangerous trade that must stop, and the DMFI stands ready to help provide practical and on-the-ground support to secure the dual aims of eliminating both the dog and cat meat trades and rabies.’

In a country where rabies remains endemic in all but eight of its 34 provinces after West Nusa Tenggara lost its rabies-free status earlier this year, DMFI campaigners warn it is only a matter of time before more people die of this disease that the government’s Ministry of Health had pledged to eliminate by 2020.

Among the cruel practices uncovered by investigators was dogs being killed in front of other animals, needlessly increasing their stress and suffering

Dogs are tied up in a basket on the back of a motorbike, bound for markets in Solo

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