Residents on Britain's worst road for broadband blast connection

Frustrated residents on Britain’s worst road for broadband blast ‘absolutely awful’ connection on affluent Surrey street where homes sell for as much as £1.25m that has made WFH a nightmare

  • Queens Road in Weybridge, Surrey has average download speeds of 0.12Mbps 
  • Today residents told how poor Internet had made conference calls a disaster  
  • Dale Lane in Appleton, Cheshire has an average broadband speed of 6.39.67Mbs

Residents on Britain’s worst street for broadband – where an affluent neighbourhood where houses sell for as much as £1.25million – today blasted their ‘absolutely awful’ connection that has made working from home a nightmare. 

Queens Road in Weybridge, Surrey, took the crown for the most sluggish connection, coming in with average download speeds of 0.12Mbps. 

Dale Lane in Appleton, Cheshire, was named quickest, achieving average speeds of 639.67Mbps, according to a study by USwitch. 

This would mean the unfortunate residents of Queens Road would have to wait approximately 119 hours to download a two-hour high definition film, while Dale Lane’s lucky inhabitants could expect it within about a minute and 20 seconds.

Today, residents on Queens Road told MailOnline they had been forced to fork out for multiple boosters to boost their Internet speeds, and felt at a loss after trying almost every provider. 

Queens Road in Weybridge, Surrey, took the crown for the most sluggish connection, coming in with average download speeds of 0.12Mbps

Queens Road in Weybridge, Surrey has the slowest average broadband in the UK 

One woman told of her embarrassment being kicked out of online conference calls due to the shoddy service while working at home in lockdown.

The project manager, in her mid-40s, who gave her name only as Connie, said: ‘It is awful, it is absolutely awful. When the connection goes down, naturally it is very embarrassing.

‘It is difficult, especially more so when Covid happened, with people working from home. I’m a project manager and it drops when you are in the middle of a conference call.

‘It is very embarrassing when this happens and you can not reconnect. I have changed providers a lot of times but with Sky, it is particularly awful. I tried three before Sky and I am now moving to another provider again.

‘I have lived here for about two years but I am moving house as we speak. The broadband is not the reason but it is a factor.’

Another resident, who lives in a three storey townhouse off Queens Road, has had to fork out for multiple boosters to ensure he stays connected.

The man, who did not wish to be named, said: ‘We are with Sky and we have to have three boosters as well as the main box, otherwise some rooms do not get covered.

‘We were told the broadband connection is good laterally but not vertically and we live in a three-storey townhouse.

‘So we have to have a booster downstairs, a booster in the middle and a booster upstairs.’

Juan Sacci, a 52-year-old consultant said: ‘It is always poor. It is never 100 per cent.

‘We have not got a booster but it can be very bad. I am with Talk Talk. We have changed providers but it is always the same. I have noticed than some signals are better than others.’

Another local , who lives in a large detached cottage on Queens Road, is also forced to use boosters to improve her connection as she tries to work from home despite the poor service.

Today, residents on Queens Road told MailOnline they had been forced to fork out for multiple boosters to boost their Internet speeds, and felt at a loss after trying almost every provider. Pictured is an fibre broadband box on the street 

The woman, who did not wish to be named, said: ‘Oh it is terrible. Every house you knock once they will tell you how bad it is here.

‘We have got boosters and all sorts to boost the signal but we still have ongoing issues. I think it was about £100 to have the booster installed in the loft.’

Meanwhile some locals and business owners based on the Queens Road high street said they did not have any internet difficulties.

One resident, who also did not wish to be named, added: ‘We are with BT and surprisingly, we have not had any issues here.

‘But there is a box over the road and you often see workers fiddling with it.’         

Uswitch.com conducted the research based on some 398,973 ‘real world’ speed tests run by broadband users over the last year.

The comparison site fears that the digital divide could be growing deeper as the fastest street was only 830 times quicker than the slowest in its 2019 analysis.

‘The digital divide that runs through Britain has grown dramatically in the last year, with the fastest street’s broadband more than 5,000 times quicker than the slowest’s,’ said Ernest Doku, broadband expert at Uswitch.com.

‘It’s interesting to see that the North claims the fastest street this year, while the slowest street is in the south east, showing that the speed of your connection has nothing to do with where you live.

‘It’s great that more of us are enjoying ultra-fast broadband, but we don’t want to see large swathes of the country left behind on shoddy connections that aren’t suitable for modern life.’

Dale Lane, Appleton, Warrington, Cheshire, has the quickest average broadband in the United Kingdom with a speed of  639.67Mbps

However, the findings suggest that the number of broadband users enjoying faster speeds is growing, with more than half (54 per cent) able to receive speeds of more than 30Mbps, up from under a quarter (22 per cent) five years ago.

There is also concern that people are not checking whether they can get faster speeds, with research showing seven out of the ten slowest streets have access to a quicker service.

‘With millions of us working from home and watching more streaming TV at the moment, a good broadband connection is more important than ever,’ Doku continued.

‘One of the biggest obstacles stopping people from getting faster downloads speeds is the lack of awareness regarding superfast and ultra-fast broadband.

‘For example, some people on the UK’s fastest street, Dale Lane, enjoy speeds above 900Mbps, while others only get 5.5Mbps.

‘And of the ten slowest streets, seven could have access to faster broadband, so we urge residents there – and anyone else unhappy with their broadband speeds – to do a quick check online to see what speeds they could be getting.’   

The news comes a month after Boris Johnson scrapped his manifesto promise to roll out superfast internet to every home and business by 2025.

Full-fibre and gigabit-capable broadband to every home and business across the UK by 2025 was a key Conservative manifesto pledge in the 2019 general election.

But the Prime Minister downgraded the target to reach 85 per cent of the UK, according to an infrastructure report.

Doubts over the Government’s ambitious pledge on gigabit-capable broadband came to the fore last month after the minister responsible for its roll-out failed to say how confident he felt about making the 2025 target.

The slowest broadband in the country was in Queens Road, Weybridge, pictured

Conservatives are concerned the backtrack will infuriate the millions of people in the UK who are suffering from bad internet – especially when many are working from home due to coronavirus.

‘There is a worry this will hit old Red Wall seats that switched to the Tories at the last election,’ a Conservative insider told The Sun.

‘These seats cover large areas of small towns and villages who might now miss out on getting superfast broadband.’

Mr Johnson had also pledged £5 billion of public funding to connect all homes and businesses – no matter how rural they are.

But Treasury Spending Review documents released this week reveal the Prime Minister has gone back on his promise.

The infrastructure report said: ‘The government is working with industry to target a minimum of 85 per cent gigabit capable coverage by 2025, but will seek to accelerate roll-out further to get as close to 100 per cent as possible.

‘The government will continue to implement an ambitious programme of work to remove barriers to broadband deployment and maximise coverage in the hardest to reach areas of the country.’

The move means thousands of home may have to wait years to get super-quick internet access.

Alison Walsh, a media consultant from the village of Lillingstoke Lovell, Bucks, said one local business owner moved away because of the poor internet.

‘You can forget things like Netflix and Amazon Prime, they’re beyond us at the moment,’ she told The Sun.

‘Even just paying for things online can take several attempts.

‘We’ve already had one lady move away with her family because her husband was trying to run his own business from home, so they moved to another village where they had better speeds.’           

The findings suggest that the number of broadband users enjoying faster speeds is growing, with more than half (54 per cent) able to receive speeds of more than 30Mbps, up from under a quarter (22 per cent) five years ago

Slowest broadband speeds of 2020 

1. Queens Road, Weybridge, Surrey – 0.12Mbps

2. Hatchett Road, Feltham, Hounslow, London – 0.38Mbps

3. Monkton, Devon – 0.45Mbps

4. Church Street, Great Maplestead, Halstead, Essex – 0.47Mbps

5. Limmer Close, Wokingham, Berkshire – 0.48Mbps

6. Waterley Bottom, North Nibley, Dursley, Gloucestershire – 0.49Mbps

7. Spencer Road, Caterham, Surrey – 0.55Mbps

8. Ringhaddy Road, Killinchy, Newtownards, Northern Ireland – 0.62Mbps

9. Fishtoft Drove, Frithville, Boston, Lincolnshire – 0.66Mbps

10. Sopwith Crescent, Wimborne, Dorset – 0.67Mbps

Fastest broadband speeds in 2020 

1. Dale Lane, Appleton, Warrington, Cheshire – 639.67Mbps

2. Longhedge, Caldecotte, Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire – 568.18Mbps

3. Old Ballynahinch Road, Lisburn, Northern Ireland – 563.85Mbps

4. Montvale Gardens, Leicester, Leicestershire – 452.02Mbps

5. Mill Close, Henlow, Bedfordshire- 360.59Mbps

6. York Road, Guildford, Surrey – 352.67Mbps

7. Chapel Road, Oldbury-on-Severn, Gloucestershire – 284.92Mbps

8. Woodcroft Road, Liverpool, Merseyside – 282.21Mbps

9. Cairn Wynd, Inverurie, Scotland – 276.40Mbps

10. Sandy Hamilton Place, Inverurie, Scotland – 253.17Mbps

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